ABOUT GLSC

ABOUT US

OUR HISTORY

OUR COMMUNITY

The schools of early German-speaking immigrants to the US were private, community based, and taught the language of the homeland. They predated public schooling that introduced English. With the ensuing decline of German language instruction, members of the German-American community created private language schools to teach the heritage language.

The oldest almost continuously operating language schools were founded in Boston in 1874 and in New York in 1892. The majority of German language schools however, were established after 1945. As in the past, the scarcity of German language and culture programs in many parts of the country inspired the German-American community to establish German language schools to meet the needs of their children.

Today, German language schools cater to a broad range of students from native speakers to heritage language learners to those truly learning German as a foreign language. The schools strive to convey a modern image of Germany and the cultures of other German-speaking countries. Even though they operate outside the national and state education systems, they constitute a valuable enhancement to the educational landscape of the US, where German is increasingly not an option among the foreign languages offered in public and private schools. 

Most schools teach the German language on all proficiency levels - A1 to C1 of the Common European Framework of References (CEFR) or Novice to Advanced of the Proficiency Guidelines by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), and prepare their students to take the National German Exam of 

the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG), the Advanced Placement German Language and Culture Exam (AP), the SAT Subject Test German, and the German Language Diploma (Deutsches Sprachdiplom or DSD). 

Currently, there are more than 50 German language schools all across the US. While the enrollment figures fluctuate, the present number of students in these schools is estimated at about 7,000. Many of the schools are members of the PASCH Initiative, a global network of some 1800 schools with links to Germany. PASCH, which stands for “Schools: Partners for the Future,” was launched in 2008 by the Federal Foreign Office of Germany in cooperation with several other German stakeholders. Most of the schools are also members of the GLSC.

OUR ASSOCIATIONS

The GLSC is a sustaining member of the Weltverband Deutscher Auslandsschulen (WDA). We enjoy the support of the German Embassy in Washington, the German Consulate General New York, the Zentralstelle für das Auslandsschulwesen in Bonn/Germany (ZfA), the Goethe Institute and the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD).  Additionally, we work with professional organizations such as the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG), and universities involved in German and research into heritage language education worldwide.

OUR GOALS

01

TO ASSIST MEMBER SCHOOLS

To assist our member schools in teaching the language and culture of German-speaking countries on all proficiency levels

03

02

TO REPRESENT INTERESTS OF MEMBER SCHOOLS

To represent the interests of our member schools to German and US government agencies, professional organizations and other stakeholders

TO ENHANCE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

To enhance the professional development of German language school educators and administrators by organizing a yearly conference

05

TO ASSIST WITH THE FOUNDING OF NEW SCHOOLS

04

TO PROMOTE THE EXCHANGE OF BEST PRACTICES

To offer a forum for sharing best practices concerning the teaching of the language and culture of German-speaking countries at our conference and beyond

To assist educators and administrators in establishing new German language schools in the US

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PO Box 631 Berwyn, PA 19312 |  info@germanschools.org  |  Tel. 203.792.2795

The German Language School Conference, incorporated since 1978